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to save someone's soul. he in turn was drawn to her strength, her morals, her driving energy and her unwavering ambition, and her indomitable drive. but within a short time she realized he was and in court jubal drunk. -- in court jubal drunk. and despite his own international celebrity, he could not spare her rising thing. rebecca west who have met thompson in london in 1921, whom jim spoke about in his introduction, and later when dorothy was a chief of the bureau in berlin, was as courageous and as an domino ball as american friend, possibly more so. kindred spirits intent on breaking through that concrete ceiling of male-dominated literature and journalism. they both were intent on confronting the pivotal issues of their times head-on. and they would remain friends all of their lives. rebecca west had as humble a beginning as dorothy thompson eric she was born so silly isabel fairfield on the outskirts of london in 1892 to a scotch highland mother with musical aspirations, and a truly gifted journalist father. when he left them, abandoned them to poverty, when she, too, was only
centers by design consume vast amounts of energy in an incon grewously wasteful manner, interviews and documents show. >> guest: that's right. yeah. and, um, we also point out that the different players in this industry do behave differently. so there are better players, and there are more wasteful players. there is a range. we started talking about the typical data center. the data centers that are using most of the energy out there doing these digital tasks, everything from banks to big department stores, and what i meant by that was that, um, the computers in these data centers typically are actually not doing anything but drawing electricity for the most part. most of the electricity, in fact, a large majority of the electricity that goes into a typical data center is really powering a computer that's waiting for something to do. and these things once they're turned on, because we as consumers insist that this infrastructure always be available and nebraska run out of -- and never run out of capacity, those computers are sitting there just waiting for us to call upon them to do
to save someone's soul. he in turn was drawn to her strength, her moral core, herd driving energy and her unwavering ambition and her drive, but within a short time she realized he was an incorrigible drunk, and despite his own international celebrity, she could not bear her rising fame. rebecca west who have meant constant in 1921, whom jim spoke about in his introduction, and later when dorothy was the chief of the bureau in berlin was as courageous as her american trend, possibly more so spirits intent on breaking through that concrete ceiling of male dominated the literature and journalism they both were intent on confronting the pivotal issues of their time head-on, and they would remain friends of their lives. it was as humble as a beginning as dorothy. she was born sicily isabel on the a outskirts of london in 18922 space thailand mother with musical aspirations in a truly gifted journalist father when she abandoned them to poverty. she was both devastated and in the liberated. as angry as she was, she liked thompson was able to convince herself. naughty and rebellious ms. fairfiel
of the guest which is why franklin told us they began to sink after three days. the toll and energy is a huge. they say you know when a marriage is falling apart as the husband or wife conversation progress is logically. [laughter] he was once part jew. [laughter] it's impossible to convene the smallest and most transitory of human groups without them improvising at the can on discovery social structure which is to say culture. the culture grows in mysterious ways and has nothing to do with reason. is it reasonable for example that all americans have to say what seems to be the trouble officer? [laughter] where was it written or do they have to say we can't come to the phone right now but if you leave your name and phone number? where in the worlds are these described? the culture extemporizes itself and in response to the communal from necessity to deal with what also extemporizes the mess. he's no less the political views or the modes of organizations can derive from the limited recuring number of human problems and human solutions. the left discovery of global warming, the sinfulness of ma
. it defies the first law. the law of the conservation of energy. every respectable scientists will understand, why live, in exasperation and trying to get simple objects across to you, infinitely smaller than a pinprick infinitely shows its head. suddenly, a call of singularity. this just does not make sense. act as if nothing has happened. meanwhile, that pinprick blows up so fast that it makes me dizzy. and it has three properties that never existed before. three properties that are common sense prevailed should not exist. those properties are time, space, and speed. how in the nonexistent world to the nothingness pull this off? the pinprick keeps coming out. a space-time manifold occurs and i am stunned. what is happening? what is powering all the speed. oneworld invented these peculiar things? if they weren't invented, how the heck did the others break them out? well, i'm sitting here with my jaw-dropping. you are as cool as a scoop of gelato in a block of ice. you make another of your wacky predictions. the giant sale of space and time is about to produce something. called things. those
, to our energy community who rely on energy tax breaks to keep on moving and keep on producing. so i don't want to see economic growth derailed. it was too horribly painful to sit through this very difficult economic recovery inch by inch, every day hoping we would push forward despite the odds. we have the -- we had the economic crisis in europe that weighed on us as well. well, what we did this morning was important. so i want to close by saying this to my friends in the house, all of them, democrats, republicans, liberals, moderates and conservativesmen conservati. this is not a perfect deal. we all know it. you know, each of us can find a piece of it that we really, really don't like. but on the whole, it will give certainty to this economy. in many cases, many of the provisions are permanent, like the a.m.t. it gives certainty and certainty is critical. we will not go back. we will not take billions and billions of dollars out of this economy. we can't do that now. and i would say to my conservative friends over there, now it's the 1st of the year, you're actually cutting taxes now.
get a lot of psychic energy of being the mayor of the city and i'm there, but there's managers who get the job done every day you don't hear about. the same work that we do, i'm very proud to give support to the incredible work you're doing, but you know there's heros of light and energy that are working within covenant house in newark making transformative changes. there is a young kid one day to be born to one of the children there and you'll never know their name, generations unborn feel that love. that's the challenge to everybody, and this is -- science shows us, you look at the stars tonight, and you live in manhattan, so you probably won't be able to see a star, but imagine when you look up and see a star, think hundreds of billions of light years away, and many of the stars you are looking at are gone. they no longer exist, and the billion of years the light takes to get to you, the star is actually gone, but the energy and life is immuneble and goes on forever. people, generations yet unborn feel the warmth and light of that body. that's who we are. we may have a finite time o
in the energy crisis in the 70's. the cia was just too bureaucratic for me. so i wanted to break out and do something more on gennaro. i get involved in the financial revolution, started being a managing editor of a news article, the inflation survival letters in the 1970's which is now called personal finance, a much more establishment name. my own newsletters forecast and strategies. seven robbery and was elected and it has been a great ride. i consider myself a survivor in many ways. i maintained my contacts and the cia because i think there are a good source for information. we're a global economy, and the cia does everything. they've done research on virtually everything. >> we invited you want book tv to talk about the making of modern economics, the lives and ideas of right thinkers. >> cannot in 2001. it took me about five years to sit down and actually right. probably a lifetime of learning. and then the second edition came out in 2009 right after the financial crisis. we felt it needed to be updated after that event because my final chapter is dr. smith goes to washington, the tri
that many get an energy power in the century. this is living in geography. your argument about russia and russia's in security would be that it's too flat. half the world's longitudes but it's indefensible, it runs north, south so they don't unite the country and had less people than bangladesh. 141 million people, bangladesh has more. so vladimir putin sent up near imperialism on the deepak geographical and security and that's how we should understand not as a madman hour to totalitarian but it's a very traditional autocrat. >> one of the interesting hinges of this book is your discussion about the fall of the berlin wall, and if i read it right, you say that it may appear optimists. it made us to convinced that himeno agencies our system of democracy, system of free markets would have the transforming power. >> talk about that and take that story through the 1980's and into the 90's. >> the fall of the berlin wall eliminated constraints. we thought because we can get to the red army out of eastern europe it suddenly with a transforming effect in the middle east and sub-saharan afric
debate it was just all over, why do we pay attention? the level of energy and interest has gone up enormous and i think that's good for all of us, no matter how comes up. comes up. it's a much more interesting, exciting, compelling race which is good for democracy spin. >> we're talking about david westin's "exit interview." if somebody has a question if you line up at the microphone would be helpful. and yes, sir, we'll start with you. >> understanding your biased toward your own crew at abc which is great, can you speak to your competition as now brian williams and his bunch, scott kelly and his bunch and so forth? and the cables of course. >> i'm happy to. bryant is driven. is number one in eating. he's earned it. he's paid his dues. he's a terrific anchor. very, very stronger a great news authorization at nbc news. their faltering a little bit in the morning a, but they deserve all the success they have had. i have enormous admiration for what cbs news is doing. i don't know, people probably don't know the inside of this, but the longtime executive producer of "60 minutes" has
of the manufacturing costs and some of the alternative energy manufacturing costs are coming down. the equation is a little more balanced, and that said, you know, in the case of apple, they do the manufactures here, but in the case where they have to integrate design and production to make the new iphone, they do that stuff here, but then theyoff shore mass production which is the biggest challenge for the united states. how to get the mass production back. where -- most of the companies i focus on are either small or medium sizedded businesses. they are making niche products or interesting customized products where you can't mass produce it. you can't just offshore that to china, or they are constantly staying at the front of the innovation curve. one of the companies named one, two, three, that i deal with says they basically have an agreement with china saying that they will give them all the old technology to satisfy the joint venture agreement as long as they don't have to give them their newest latest technology. they are basically giving them intellectual property that's anything but th
a seminar based on the book and brought in people from the energy department, darpa and ibm. in reality, the path to understanding these things has been shown in what mendel wrote. men dover road went beyond conventional mathematics. he ditched the mathematics of his uncle who is a great mathematician of his era and it's the mathematics and the equations which was largely their in order to keep us from understanding math so we wouldn't apply it for new weapons and they went back to making math what it had been since the beginning of mathematics, pictures. he did it using a visual. he worked for business machine company. this machine company had come up with this incredible business machine called computers and they got the computers to create pictures based on very simple equations, very simple equations. began the patterns emerging that would allow someday mathematics to deal with the stock market. mathematics will only be able to deal the stock market jon stewart mallon george henry luce's question coming up with the mathematics that can predict these huge jumps. big continuous jumps
media kind of energy around this book but the last time there was this kind of media energy was that, july 2010 when it went down. >> yes. >> people were going back to those places who interviewed you, who were making accusations calling you a reverse racist. the speed which that happened, how does it feel being back in the space now that you do have the whole story? >> it feels good to know that, first of all, that i was able to use that same media in a sense to be able to get the, the story, the right story out. it feels, gosh, i can't explain how great it feels to be able to sit here, to hear the actress really, oh my goodness, i don't know whether you saw me, i was crying a little. it's really amazing. i didn't ever think, i made the decision years ago that i didn't want people to forget my father and what he meant to us. i had no idea i would be able to tell the story in this way. it feels great. >> what's, what's so beautiful this book is i feel like it's more than a book. it is a living, it is a living history. it is like a love letter to choices. and it reminds us that withou
consent the energy committee be discharged from further consideration of h.r. 6060 and the senate proceed to its consideration and consideration of calendar number 269, s. 302 en bloc. the presiding officer: without objection. the clerk will report the measures en bloc. the clerk: h.r. 6060, an act to amend public law 106-392, and so forth, calendar number 269, s. 302, a bill to authorize the secretary of the interior to issue right-of-way permits for natural gas transmission pipeline, and so forth and for other purposes. mr. pryor: i ask unanimous consent the bills be read a third time and passed en bloc, the motion to reconsider be laid upon the table with no intervening action or debate, and any statements related to the bills be placed in the record at the appropriate place as if read. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. pryor: mr. president, i ask unanimous consent the senate proceed to the immediate consideration of s. res. 628 submitted earlier today by senators landrieu and blunt. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: senate resolution 628, expressing
will be okay. >> directing your energies like continuing the trustee in the preservation of all that means billion don't care whether it's physical or digital. >> and $0.1 the agency that i had, because i hate to speak exclusively, a love affair with the printed word. not on how something was presented, we were very public oriented. so you do everything you possibly can to move into the public domain. that implies you use every conceivable restaurant. we are in the knowledge development and the knowledge dissemination. we do a film. we preserve will books. we help finance the writing of new books. then we try to bring the public in texas to analysis. therefore we are very big into digitization. one of my favorite quotes, the archivist to lexus said particularly in the area of research, many young people, scholars from if it is in on the internet it doesn't exist. that's a fairly awesome thought. and so that means that it speaks to nextel's as well as tech ~. i think real identify with that, but we also identify with what i hope is that dual circumstance, have a book with paper and also hav
programs like head start. low-income families will continue to benefit from low-income energy programs, lie liheap. it protects nutrition assistance, prenatal care so we can have more healthy babies, and healthy moms. the elderly, disabled, low-income familieses and veterans will continue to receive housing assistance. over 88,000 illinoisans will continue to receive the unemployment benefits. and illinois businesses will benefit from more than $8.5 billion spending of consumer spending in a time when we desperately need this in our economy. let me say one last word. i have been involved in this deficit discussion fo discussiog period of time. this is not a deficit-reduction measure. it does reduce it. but the arcane scoring by the c.b.o. will not give us any credit for reducing the deficit. we do have more revenue coming in, but some of the other measures would be scored as send expenditures. we still have a deficit issue. we still have a deficit problem. what we tried to establish this morning in this vote, revenue has to be part of every solution on deficit reduction. the other side of t
energies continuing literacy and the preservation of all that means, you don't care either whether it's a physical book or digits? >> in 1 cents, the agency that i had, because i hate to speak exclusively as an individual, has a love affair with the printed word. but while we are not agnostic exactly on how something is presented, we are very public oriented so you do everything you possibly can to move thoughts into the public domain. that implies that you use every conceivable instrument. we are in the knowledge development and the knowledge dissemination business so we do for him. we preserve old books. we help finance the writing of new books and we tried to bring the public in to the access of the knowledge that exists and therefore we are very big into digitization, and in fact one of my favorite quotes is their archivist in the united states who likes to say particularly in the area of research, for many young people, young scholars, if it is non-the internet it does not exist. that is a fairly awesome thought. and that means iris speaks to nostalgia as well as tactility as wel
, tom putnam, who brings such energy to library's mission of preserving our nation's history. and our good friend we always love having with us, john. the president used a dictaphone to record his personal observations following key meetings and events. we thought they would all enjoy in the actual dictaphone that he used as senator before becoming president. we put it on the stage and we invite you can look at it after the form. this is the real thing, this is what he used in the senate. the one he used as president is now in the archives. over the years come we have welcomed many individuals to the state who have worked for president kennedy. those who vote for him and served in navy and knew him as a friend. they all have their own take and interpretation of what happened, their own spin. now it is the term of president kennedy. a principal speaker tonight, of which we invite you to listen to. it is that of president kennedy. many see this is the one president kennedy never had the opportunity to write. it is now my great pleasure to introduce the individual who is most responsible
'd get $5.6 million less in funding, low-income energy assistance payments to people in our state who heat with oil, and on and on. this is all my way of coming back to the -- to the point i made at the beginning and -- and why i'm encouraged by the statements president obama and senator mcconnell have made this afternoon, that we're close to an agreement, close to a deal. i don't agree, i say again, that no deal is better than a bad deal. in this case of the fiscal cliff, no deal is the worst deal possible for the american people. we passed the time when we're going to -- before tonight, negotiate the comprehensive, bipartisan debt-reduction agreement that our country desperately needs. the least we can do is protect the constituents who were good enough to send us here from the worst possible result, which is that we let the country go over the cliff, we -- we prove that to everybody, including people around the world who depend on american strength and watch us, that our political system has become absolutely dysfunctional. so i hope the negotiations going on now end with an agreem
statesmen draw the energy. not simply the opportunistic slogans but the african name tenacity by broderick for the personality cult. that's what i'm talking about. just among the people you find in their. and when you come back, you spread the word. you convey the essence of what she would serve. it's the only way it can be done. and of course you have no feeling for its come you have no feeling for you. richard wright came to africa looking for his african roots. he came away saying i don't belong here and pitch perfect and also who is now an ambassador or a western ambassador said ken looked at the negative side and he abandoned hope and ended up being japanese. [laughter] at but expressing yourself, ready to take on the experiences. >> just to clarify a point that may have been represented because you are not saying that the west and the arabic realms -- you are saying within africa this influences are ultimately going to dissipate and if the african spirit that will come through, yes? >> are you saying that she said a kind of incompatibility at the moment between the arab culture? >> n
to say his energy and intellectual creativity combine in novel ways of thinking. he constantly pushes us to think differently in new ways, more nimbly and provocatively. that is a spirit that infuses tom's new book, "the generals." he explores generalship of good and bad in accountability and traces the history of generalship from george washoe and world war ii to chosin reservoir and vietnam. to colin powell and the gulf war and the generals who commanded the iraq from 2003 on. the general argues the military is change over its years in the way it rewards good generalship and punishes bad. toms is a provocative argument and one that we will examine in detail and nice conversation. joining tom in this conversation is susan glasser one of the nations top national security journalist. susan is the editor-in-chief of foreign-policy magazine has done tremendous work in billing foreign-policy.com into a key locus of the nationals carry discussion. prior to joining foreign-policy susan was reported to "the washington post" and the capitol hill newspaper roll call and brings great experience an
energy, buoyant optimism and large faith in themselves in particular. and this is the entrepreneurial type. and these are exactly the characteristics which allow the entrepreneurs to achieve great things and, also, to go broke. this is, fits in this great quote that's in tom's book about a long history of success is the biggest precursor to failure. well, think of what the successful entrepreneur has learned. he's learned that when i have all these helpers around telling me i can't do this, too risky, it'll never work, and i do it anyway and i succeed. so how does he look at all these advisers in the entrepreneur's eyes who want to tell him next time you can't do it? we have to ask ourselves what happens to minsky's dialectic or balance between the entrepreneur and the banker, which i think is such a nice way to think about this, when the entrepreneurs take over the banks? and this is the point minsky was making. so when this entrepreneurial type takes over the bank that's supposed to be the risk-avers, cynical, worried about risk type, well, what do you get? well, you might get a, yo
usefully dedicate our energies and our intelligence is. in order to sustain and nurture the ever evolving culture is of the book. thank you very at. [applause] >> this program is part of the 2012 international summit of the book. for more information, visit loc.gov/international-book -- don't summit. >> who is rob cox? >> he is my deceased uncle who made the decision six months before pearl harbor brought america into world war ii, he made the decision that he wanted to fight the war against them and went to england and enlisted as an officer candidate with the british army. he took with him porphyrins, another man who was a student at harvard who had recently graduated and they were doing what they could to help the cause. saving their liberties against the forces of market fascism. >> he was studying at harvard at the time. what was his life trajectory at that point? >> he liked his four brothers and they had grown up in new jersey together and vermont where his family had had property for quite a long time. several generations. he went to prep school at st. paul's school, where he was
of educating young people is really remarkable. analog that goes to the energy, and to be candid, the fund-raising ability that john brings us. so, john, thank you for your work. [applause] >> i hope all of you will join close to me in keeping mrs. reagan in your prayers. she is a remarkable woman who spent a lifetime serving this country. and we all cherish her, as she continues to be active and continues to play a role here at the library. so i couldn't come here, and i mentioned nancy fortissimo their aisles with say, governor, it's great to be back with you. we did a lot of things over the years. from being made in san diego to u.s. senator to governor, to a leader in a variety of ways. i look to pete wilson and to gale as great people who represent the willingness to serve the state and the country in an important way. i want to say, it's always a family engagement if you're out there, thank you both for serving the country but it really does make a difference. it's great to be back here. [applause] >> i did not you would be with us, but we are thrilled to have you here. callista and
, that we agreed were important for rural communities, for energy security for our country, for jobs, for farmers and ranchers. and now i understand that the republican leader has insisted in his negotiations that only part of the farm bill be extended for the next nine months. not all of it, not all of the pieces that affect rural america and farmers and ranchers but only part of it. now, they call that a clean extension. because of the way the funding and base line works. i call that -- i won't say would i would call it frankly. except to say that this is bad news for american agriculture, and certainly for the people that i represent in michigan. now, why do i say that? well, first of all, in our extension we make sure that we keep our commitment on disaster assistance. we passed an important disaster assistance bill a few days ago here in the senate. i supported that. but agriculture wasn't in it. the majority of the counties in this country suffering from severe drought, cherry growers in my state being wiped out, other fruit growers having problems, nothing for agriculture. wel
objection. mr. durbin: i ask unanimous consent the energy committee be darnld from further consideration of s. 2015 and s. 3563, that the senate proceed to their consideration along with the following bills en bloc -- h.r. 3263, h.r. 3641 and h.r. 4073 which are received from the house and are thresk, calendar number 284, s. 1047, calendar number 288, s. 1421, calendar number 289, s. 1478, calendar number 272, s. 499, calendar number 266, s. 140, and calendar number 265, s. 114. the presiding officer: without objection, the committee is discharged and the senate will proceed to the measure en bloc. mr. durbin: i ask unanimous consent that where applicable, the committee-reported amendments be considered, that any amendments to those amendments which are at the desk be agreed to, that the committee-reported amendments as amended, if amended, be agreed to, the bills as amended, if amended, be read a third time and passed en bloc, that a title amendment for s. 114 be agreed to, the motions to reconsider be laid upon the table with no intervening action or debate and any statements related t
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)